British Culture & Expressions

By the close of play

Stultifying Jargon vs Proper English

Today at work I received an email with the idiom “by the close of play today”. After doing some research, and reading this article 10 of the worst example of management-speak, I got more confused. It reviews the strangled vocabulary of management-speak. Now, I am in two minds: Should I learn this stultifying jargon or keep my eyes in learning proper English?

What happens with the simplicity?

Going forward vs “from now on” or “in future”. Drill down vs “look at in detail”. By the close of play vs “by the end of the day today”. Action vs “Actionables”. Deliver vs “deliverables”. Issues vs “problem”. Leverage vs “use” or “exploit”. Competencies vs “abilities”. Sunset vs “cancel” or ” kill”

Joining the dots in an example:

The are some issues with the Project.  We are going to sunset it. Only if you have the core competencies will you be able to action the key deliverables for your relevant stakeholders going forward. We need to drill down our strategy and leverage our synergies by the close of play today.

Real online examples:

  • Going forward, let’s consign this inane phrase to history.

  • Drill down and compare countries across any indicator to discover your own granular insights.

  • I’m under a lot of pressure to finish this report by the end of the play.

  • B2B Marketers Prioritize Actionable Analytics When Choosing Vendors.

  • RSSB yearlong business plan focuses on six key deliverables.

  • Apple thinks iPhone X camera issues might be affecting Face ID.

  • Android Things 1.0 arrives to help IoT developers leverage Google Assistant and machine learning.

  • How HR Skills and Competencies Affect Business Development.

  • Micro-grant nonprofit Sprout Fund to ‘sunset’ by June.

Financial Related expressions:

End of day (EOD), end of business (EOB), close of business (COB), close of play (COP) or end of the play (EOP) is the end of the trading day in financial markets.

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