Grammar

How to use albeit in a sentence?

Albeit has been labelled archaic, but it appears to be making a comeback. This conjunction is formed by three words: the prefix al, which means 'completely' or 'all', the verb be in its 3rd person of singular and the pronoun it. The resulting word is all be it which in old English meant: that is, although it be (something).

Correct use of albeit.

ALBEIT = EVEN TOUGH = EVEN IF = ALTHOUGH

Albeit is a conjunction often used to introduce an adjectival or adverbial phrase that makes a concession about the preceding noun or verb—for example:

  • His house was expensive, albeit small.
  • He visited, albeit briefly.
  • He visited, albeit especially briefly.

To use ‘even though’ or ‘although’ the sentence would have to contain a clause [Remember a clause has a subject and a verb] following the conjunction:

  • His house was expensive, even tough it was small.
  • He visited, although his visit was brief
  • He visited, even if it was especially brief.

What you can’t do with albeit but can certainly do with although is introduce independent clauses. This is one of the reasons why the two words are not always interchangeable.

  • We decided to buy the car, albeit the price made us hesitate.
  • We decided to buy the car, although the price made us hesitate.

Online examples

 

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s