The history behind the idiom

To be under the weather.

The most common meaning is slightly unwell or in low spirits. Also, "in low spirits" means 'a feeling of sadness and despondency'.

The history.

Originally, in the old days,  it meant to feel seasick or to be adversely affected by bad weather. Some etymologists believe this idiom is a shortened version from the nautical phrase “under the weather bow”. The weather bow is the side upon which all the rotten weather is blowing. When a sailor was feeling seasick, he was sent down below to help his recovery, under the deck and away from the weather.

Meaning and Examples.

The most common meaning is slightly unwell or in low spirits. Also, “in low spirits” means ‘a feeling of sadness and despondency’.

Let’s look for some examples online!

  • Why extreme temperature swings have you feeling under the weather.
  • Warm October leaves retailers feeling under the weather.
  • Under the Weather? Consider These Tips Before Hitting the Gym.
  • Why does gold seem to be feeling under the weather?
  • I am feeling under the weather today. 

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